Day Trading Power Review

Day Trading Power
  • Honest
  • Quality
  • Verified Trades
  • User Experience
3.4

Summary

A surprising good stocks day trading room. Moderator really trades and keeps an honest daily log of trading results posted on website. Was able to copy the moderators trades with >95% accuracy. If you want to learn how to scalp day trade with a small trading account, this is a good option.

Sending
User Rating 2.8 (5 votes)
Comments Rating 1 (2 reviews)
Pros: Honest and verified results posted daily on website. Very consistent daily income. Stock day trading and scalping for small accounts. Was able to copy the trades of moderator with a high degree of accuracy. Inexpensive at only $77 each month.
Cons: This style requires either a US based prop trading firm, or a foreign prop trading firm. US based requires a series 7 license. Outside US can skirt the regulators, but you are risking your money outside the US.

Day Trading Power Review

Indepth Review of Day Trading Power

Writing trading reviews can be really depressing. Its difficult finding a gem. I found one. Today’s review is about a company named Day Trading Power. A stocks day trading room run by Chris Grosvenor out of Canada. This room originally came onto my radar in the summer of 2014. What caught my eye and really piqued my interest was the list of trades taken by the moderator. The list was long and thorough and looked great, but probably too good to be true. Rows of winners and very few losers. Admittedly, I thought that this must be a hustle. Nobody could be this good. And another red flag, if the moderator was so good, then why the cheap monthly cost of only $79?

The Review Process Begins

Late in the summer of 2014, I contacted Chris using a pen name and requested a trial subscription. He complained a little about offering the free trial, but I got it. I then had my assistant begin recording the trading sessions with Camtasia. Over the next 14 days, we collected nearly 80 hours of video recordings. We simply logged into the trading room, began recording and then stopped recording after the New York trading close. The recordings are typically replayed and processed within a couple of weeks of recording. The processing then requires that we watch the video and mark each entry and exit point that the moderator calls in the room. Each trade must be marked and then added to a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet is then compared to the posted performance on the website. Since Day Trading Power was highly active, and I was highly skeptical, the video did not get processed until December 2014.

Late 2014, my assistant processed the first week of trading video that we had captured. I was pretty amazed to see that the trades called in the room matched at over 95%, which is great. The second week we also got over a 95% match. We processed several hundred trades, which took a huge amount of time and effort on my assistants part, and all I remember was she telling me that we had found a good one. Keep in mind that she works remotely from the Philippines and her English is not perfect, yet she was able to understand the video with clarity and was able to clearly capture the trades. The fact that she could do this is a pretty good harbinger of how well a native English speaker is going to be able to follow the moderator in the trading room.

The Next Step In The Review

The next part of the review process is where we actually log into the trading room and attempt to copy the trades using a simulator. Many people would say that using a simulator is not really a realistic way to do this. However, a simulator is actually better than a real, live money account. Why? Because a simulator can be set so that no orders can be filled on a limit price. In other words, the entry and exit price must actually trade through and not just touch. A real live money account will sometimes fill a limit order, but a conservative simulator will not, which makes it a much better way to determine the authenticity and expectancy of future trading performance. Anyway, back to our simulator account and what we experienced at Day Trading Power. The first 2 days, my assistant copied each trade on a simulator and to our surprise, she actually performed better than Chris. It was not by much, but she actually got better fills on a 6 different occasions. This was probably do to the fact that Chris got a fill at Exchange A, while my assistant got a fill confirmation on Exchange B. Regardless, we were pleasantly surprised. Next step is for me spend a few days in the trading room and take a close and critical examination.

My Personal Experience With Day Trading Power

I spent the week of January 5th through January 9th sitting in the Day Trading Power trading room. I had no idea why Chris was entering or exiting, he teaches the set ups separately. All I wanted to do was enter and exit on a simulator and record what happened. On Day 1 I recorded 34 trades, with 29 winners and only 5 losers. I traded a standard 100 share lot, and made a meager sum of about $100 for the day, after commissions. Chris was trading about 500 shares average and made about $500 for the day.

Days 2, 3, 4 and 5 were more of the same. About 30-40 trades each day, with profits averaging just short of $200 for the day. This might not sound like much, but considering that I had nearly no draw down, and that the room was active, easy and pretty fun to trade, its really hard to find something to be critical about. I was really impressed that a simulator set on the most conservative settings could actually replicate very closely what Chris was doing.

One thing that sort of concerned me was the amount of commissions that were being paid out to trade this type of trading style. I emailed Chris and discovered that he spends an average of about 15% of his profits on trading commissions. Folks, you cannot make any money with this if your account is with Schwab, Scottrade, Etrade or any normal retail broker. You need to go for the thinnest possible trading commissions to make any real money with this.

Another Consideration

This is a highly active stocks day trading room. And stocks day trading means that if your broker is located in the United States, then you must either keep and maintain a balance of $25,000 or keep your day trades to three or less. Most people do not have $30,000 in available minimum money. So then this leaves two possible solutions. The first is get a series 7 license and trade through a prop firm. The second option, and the easiest option is to open a prop trading account in a another country that is not bound to US trading regulations. If this seems sketchy to you, it does for me as well.

What Does Day Trading Power Recommend?

In speaking with Chris, he uses a prop shop located in Ontario, Canada. The name is Nonko and you can read more at www.nonkotrading.com. If Canada seems a little too sketchy, then please review my United States based stock trading prop shops. They do require a series 7 but at least you have an extra layer of security knowing that the company is located in US. Regardless, I do not believe that this should not be a major hindrance to getting into the game.

Wrapping Things Up

At the end of the day, I am really impressed with Day Trading Power. Chris is honest and he really cares about his “tribe”, he takes his time to make sure everyone knows exactly what he is doing with his trades. Everything is very transparent and open, no limit order fake trading that we see so much of in the trading education community. This guy really trades, and he really does make money. Yes, he trades a scalping style that can be faster paced and expensive, but the upside is that the trading days moves pretty quickly and is quite entertaining.

Advice For The Newbie

If you take the plunge on Day Trading Power, I recommend that you start with simulator for the first week. Do your best to copy exactly what is happening. Do not focus on the why, just focus on being a clerk. Copy and master your entry and exit orders, you will thank me later. If after a week, you were able to copy and make a profit with the simulator, then I would recommend purchasing the manual which contains all of the set ups. The cost is $150, which in my opinion is hardly anything. Once you have the manual, then you can start to really synthesize the what and why of Chris’s methods.

Once again, thanks for reading. FYI, I am in the process of opening a prop account and will be trading a live account in the weeks ahead at Day Trading Power. Check back with me for an update on how things are going with my trading. And don’t forget to leave comments below.

 

Leave a Reply

128 Comments on "Day Trading Power Review"

avatar
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
  Subscribe  
Notify of